Labor Day

Well, there went summer.  I finally caught up with the weeds since we had a break in the heat and humidity, and I actually felt like gardening for a change.  I should have taken a photo of the piles and piles of crabgrass, hogweed, etc.   Yuck.  There have been a few bright spots the last few weeks despite the groundhogs and rabbits ruining some of my planned color combos.

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Kim’s daylily and the bottle tree

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The new porch is looking spiffy  – need to thin those lilacs

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Yarrow and Faith’s phlox – with an interloper to be removed

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The Brugmansia bloomed – I think this is year 8

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The humidity has brought out lots of cool mushrooms

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I grew a heart shaped tomato

 

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 This funky dragonfly showed up

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And these guys returned…..

That’s it for now.  I’m looking forward to cooler days and better gardening weather.  We still need to landscape around the new porch, thin out the lilacs, prune back the forsythia hedge, transplant stuff, etc. etc. etc.

 

 

6 thoughts on “Labor Day

  1. I can’t believe how quickly summer is flying by. (In denial that it’s over and won’t acknowledge it’s passing until the equinox later in Sept.) Lots of wonderful things happening in your garden. Great shot of that funky dragonfly!

  2. Ooh, that brugmansia is sculptural. I just wrote about one that I thought was dead. It gets frosted in winter, but should be right back in spring. My colleague grows the brugmansia that was used for the illustration in the Sunset Western Garden Book.

    • oool. i got this one as a tiny shoot from logee’s greenhouse about 8 years ago i think. every fall we clip it back so it will fit under the door and we drag it into the basement and let it go dormant – it gets watered once a month.. in the spring we drag it back outside. i need to try to hack back the roots and repot it this year but i hate to risk losing it

      • I recommend using pruning scraps as cuttings. What I mean is when you must prune it, or if bits get broken off while moving it, sticking the pruned off or broken off stems as cuttings for new plants. You can always share them with neighbors if you get too many.

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